Sewer Back-UpSewer back-up

Backups are not only a major hassle, but a sign that something’s wrong with your drain system. They occur when some type of blockage is preventing wastewater from flowing properly away from your home to your drain field or the municipal sewer system.

Below is a summary of how sewer line backups end up spilling over into your home.

  1. A blockage halts the flow of wastewater: The blockage can arise from
    various things, like sewer line clogs or tree root infiltration into your sewer line. It may also be caused by sewer line damage, like cracks or holes in the line, a sagging or collapsed sewer line or a complete break in the sewer line itself.
  2. Wastewater builds up in the sewer line: With nowhere to go, wastewater will accumulate in the portion of the line that’s connected to a home. As plumbing fixtures in that home are used, more and more wastewater will build up in the line.
  3. Wastewater will find the nearest release point: Eventually, the line will be filled with wastewater, unable to hold any more. When that happens, wastewater will find the closest discharge point or the point of the less resistance. This will be the lowest drain in your home, which is typically a basement floor drain or a laundry sink.
  4. The backup will continue to build and cause problems with a home’s plumbing fixtures: As wastewater keeps building up in the sewer line, it can start to enter the drain lines that connect to a home’s plumbing fixtures. This will trigger problems with these fixtures, like multiple drain clogs at one time and gurgling toilets and drains. These problems can also include persistent foul odors coming from drains and backups in tubs or sinks when toilets are flushed.

At this point, it’s usually quite apparent that something’s not right with the plumbing, and it’s time to call a professional drain cleaner like Smith Drain Solutions.

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